Posts Tagged ‘Winter’

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Astronomy Events – March 2016

February 29, 2016

by Adam Welbourn

If Spring is on the way it seems to have neglected to let the temperature know! The wind has been bitter recently, meaning the few crystal clear evenings we were afforded in February were too frosty for any serious viewing.

But with British Summer Time virtually upon us, nothing heralds the onset of more favourable outdoor conditions than longer days.

So in order to keep your curiosities piqued we’ve once again selected some astronomical happenings of note for the month, now get out into the dark and enjoy the infinite view!

Keep watching those skies…

Tuesday 1st March  – This evening our Moon will be seen at Last Quarter phase

Monday 7th March – In the early dawn light you may be able to spot the thinnest sliver of crescent Moon just above Venus. A great chance for some photography if your seeing conditions are favourable

If your eastern horizon is flat enough the sliver of Moon over Venus will be a great sight if your seeing conditions are good (click to enlarge) - Credit: Sky-Watching/Stellarium

If your eastern horizon is flat enough the sliver of Moon over Venus will be a great sight, if you can spot them in the early dawn light! (click to enlarge) – Credit: Sky-Watching/Stellarium

Wednesday 8th March – Gas giant Jupiter is at opposition in the constellation Cancer this evening, meaning it rises at sunset and sets at sunrise. A good opportunity for observing or imaging this beauty!

Look to the south east about 22:00 UTC and you’ll find it as the brightest object in the night sky

With binoculars or a small telescope you can see Jupiter's moons - Credit: Sky-Watching/A.Welbourn

With binoculars or a small telescope you can see Jupiter’s moons – Credit: Sky-Watching/A.Welbourn

Wednesday 9th March – Today the New Moon rises and sets with the Sun, so now is a good time to observe deep sky objects like galaxies and nebulae, or get a clearer look at objects usually blurred and faint in light polluted skies

Thursday 10th March – Today the Moon is at Perigee at a distance of 359,510 km (223,389 miles) from the Earth, the closest it will come on it’s current orbit

Tuesday 15th March – This afternoon the Moon will be seen at First Quarter phase

Wednesday 16th March – To help you identify the constellations you can see throughout the month, below we’ve provided guide images for both southern and northern skies in March

Shown at 00:00 UTC on 16th March, both these images are a handy guide for the whole month. This is the view you’ll get looking South (click to enlarge) – Credit: Sky-Watching/Stellarium

Shown at 00:00 UTC on 16th March, both these images are a handy guide for the whole month. This is the view you’ll get looking South (click to enlarge) – Credit: Sky-Watching/Stellarium

Displaying the night sky midway through the month, this image can help you identify the constellations you’ll see in the northern sky in March (click to enlarge) – Credit: Sky-Watching/Stellarium

Displaying the night sky midway through the month, this image can help you identify the constellations you’ll see in the northern sky in March (click to enlarge) – Credit: Sky-Watching/Stellarium

Sunday 20th March – Today is Spring Equinox in the Northern Hemisphere

Wednesday 23rd March – This evening’s Full Moon is sometimes known as the Sleepy Moon, Fish Moon or Chaste Moon

A Full Moon can look bright and beautiful, but many details are lost in the glare (click to enlarge) - Credit: Sky-Watching/A.Welbourn

A Full Moon can look bright and beautiful, but many details are lost in the glare (click to enlarge) – Credit: Sky-Watching/A.Welbourn

Inner planet Mercury is also in Superior Conjunction today and is unobservable until the end of the month

Friday 25th March – The Moon is at Apogee today at a distance of 406,125 km (252,354 miles), the furthest point its orbit will take it away from the Earth this month

Sunday 27th March – British Summer Time begins in the UK early this morning, as clocks go forward one hour at 01:00 UTC (to 02:00 BST)

Thursday 31st March – This afternoon the Moon is at Last Quarter phase, the second time this month

As usual, if you take any photos throughout March you’d like to show us, please tweet them to us using the link below! We’d love to see your efforts and we’ll re-tweet them to your fellow sky-watchers!

Planets visible this month:

Venus
Saturn
Mars
Uranus
Jupiter
Mercury

Remember, it can take your eyes up to 20 minutes to become properly dark adapted, and anything up to an hour for a telescope to reach ambient temperature outside (to ensure the best image), so give yourself plenty of time to get set up!

To make it easier to find this list of astronomical happenings you can also locate it in the “Monthly Guide” section in the menu bar to the right. Handy! 🙂

Guide images created with Stellarium

Archive:
Astronomy Events – February 2016
Astronomy Events – January 2016
Astronomy Events – December 2015

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Astronomy Events – February 2016

January 31, 2016

by Adam Welbourn

As much as dark skies are what stargazers crave, and the longer the darkness the more gazing that can be done, it’s nice that afternoons are now noticeably lighter for longer!

Apart from a week or so of cold snowy weather affecting most of the northern UK it has been one of the mildest winters on record, so with the luck of some drier weather (let’s face it, we’re due) February could be a great time to get outside under the stars.

To help we’ve picked out some heavenly happenings for the upcoming month below, so peruse at your leisure and get out and enjoy the night!

Keep watching those skies…

Monday 1st February  – This morning our Moon will be seen at Last Quarter phase

If you have some binoculars you may be able to catch Comet Catalina close to Polaris the Pole Star over the first few evenings of February. It will drift away (towards the west) and decrease in magnitude as the month passes, so catch it while you can!

Saturday 6th February – Early risers with a flat enough horizon (and the luck of clear skies of course!) will be in for a treat just before dawn this morning. The sliver of crescent Moon sits over a bright Venus, with a faint Mercury just below and to the left

A beautiful celestial triangle appears just before sunrise this morning, look to the south east at 06:30 (UTC) to see the thin crescent Moon over Venus and Mercury - (click to enlarge) - Credit: Sky-Watching/Stellarium

A beautiful celestial triangle appears just before sunrise this morning, look to the south east at 06:30 (UTC) to see the thin crescent Moon over Venus and Mercury – (click to enlarge) – Credit: Sky-Watching/Stellarium

Sunday 7th February Mercury is at greatest western elongation today, and may be visible just before sunrise to the left of much brighter Venus, appearing to be a faint star in comparison

Monday 8th February – Today the New Moon rises and sets with the Sun, so now is a good time to observe deep sky objects like galaxies and nebulae, or get a clearer look at objects usually blurred and faint in light polluted skies

A nice object to try and locate at this time of year is the Rosette Nebula, which contains open cluster NGC 2244. If your skies aren’t too light polluted you should be able to locate it to the left of Orion, look to the south at 21:00 UTC

The stars of the open cluster shine brightly, surrounded by the gas and dust that make up the Rosette Nebula (click to enlarge) - Credit: Sky-Watching/A.Welbourn

The stars of the open cluster shine brightly, surrounded by the gas and dust that make up the Rosette Nebula (click to enlarge) – Credit: Sky-Watching/A.Welbourn

Thursday 11th February – Today the Moon is at Perigee at a distance of 364,355 km (226,400 miles) from the Earth, the closest it will come on it’s current orbit

Monday 15th February – This morning the Moon will be seen at First Quarter phase

And to help you identify the constellations you can see throughout the month, below we’ve provided guide images for both southern and northern skies in February

Shown at 00:00 UTC on 15th February, both these images are a handy guide for the whole month. This is the view you’ll get looking South (click to enlarge) – Credit: Sky-Watching/Stellarium

Shown at 00:00 UTC on 15th February, both these images are a handy guide for the whole month. This is the view you’ll get looking South (click to enlarge) – Credit: Sky-Watching/Stellarium

Displaying the night sky midway through the month, this image can help you identify the constellations you’ll see in the northern sky in February (click to enlarge) – Credit: Sky-Watching/Stellarium

Displaying the night sky midway through the month, this image can help you identify the constellations you’ll see in the northern sky in February (click to enlarge) – Credit: Sky-Watching/Stellarium

Monday 22nd February – This evening’s Full Moon is sometimes known as the Budding Moon, Storm Moon or Snow Moon

Tuesday 23rd February – Gas giant Jupiter joins our Moon in the sky tonight, can you catch it in an image despite the brightness of its companion? They will travel together for the whole evening, appearing closest in the early hours of the 24th

Shown above at 19:30 UTC, the Moon and Jupiter cross the sky as close companions all evening (click to enlarge) - Credit: Sky-Watching/Stellarium

Shown above at 19:30 UTC, the Moon and Jupiter cross the sky as close companions all evening (click to enlarge) – Credit: Sky-Watching/Stellarium

Sunday 27th February – The Moon is at Apogee today at a distance of 405,380 km (251,376 miles), the furthest point its orbit will take it away from the Earth this month

Monday 28th February – Often elusive Neptune is in conjunction with the Sun today, and is actually unobservable throughout the month

As usual, if you take any photos throughout February you’d like to show us, please tweet them to us using the link below! We’d love to see your efforts and we’ll re-tweet them to your fellow sky-watchers!

Planets visible this month:

Venus
Saturn
Mars
Uranus
Jupiter
Mercury

Remember, it can take your eyes up to 20 minutes to become properly dark adapted, and anything up to an hour for a telescope to reach ambient temperature outside (to ensure the best image), so give yourself plenty of time to get set up!

To make it easier to find this list of astronomical happenings you can also locate it in the “Monthly Guide” section in the menu bar to the right. Handy! 🙂

Guide images created with Stellarium

Archive:
Astronomy Events – January 2016
Astronomy Events – December 2015
Astronomy Events – November 2015

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Astronomy Events – January 2016

December 31, 2015

by Adam Welbourn

A new year is once again upon us, and like nearly everyone else you find us smiley faced and full of hope as to what 2016 will bring!

There’s a lot happening in January from an astronomical viewpoint, and as usual we’ve cherry picked some happenings of interest so hopefully there will be something for everyone.

And if you still need a little push out the door, BBC’s Stargazing LIVE returns to our screens on Tuesday 12th January at 21:00 on BBC2 for the first of four shows over consecutive evenings. January is a great time to go stargazing 🙂

Keep watching those skies…

Saturday 2nd January  – This morning our Moon will be seen at Last Quarter phase, and is also at Apogee at a distance of 404,275 km (251,205 miles), the furthest point its orbit will take it away from the Earth this month

Also today the Earth is at Perihelion, the closest point its orbit brings it to the Sun

1. Planet at aphelion 2. Planet at perihelion 3. Sun

1. Planet at aphelion 2. Planet at perihelion 3. Sun

Sunday 3rd January – Tonight sees the peak of the annual Quadrantids Meteor Shower. These small particles from old comet 2003 EH1 often burn blue or yellow, so get out around midnight before the Moon rises to spot those shooting stars!

Thursday 7th January – Early risers will catch a rare sight this morning, as the Moon comes up not long before the Sun with Venus and Saturn for company. Look to the south east just before 06:00 UTC

Forming a beautiful triangle in the morning sky, the Moon, Venus and Saturn are close companions before sunrise this morning (click to enlarge) - Credit: Sky-Watching/Stellarium

Forming a beautiful triangle in the morning sky; the Moon, Venus and Saturn are close companions before sunrise this morning (click to enlarge) – Credit: Sky-Watching/Stellarium

Saturday 9th January – Before sunrise this morning brilliant Venus passes very close to Saturn.  So close in fact that with the naked eye it will be difficult to tell Saturn is there at all!

Use some binoculars and you’ll soon see the two are separate (despite Venus being nearly 100 times brighter!), but through a telescope you should easily be able to fit both clearly in the same field of view. A great chance for some imaging!

Through a small telescope you should see the orb of Venus next to the ringed world of Saturn (click to enlarge) - Credit: Sky-Watching/Stellarium

Through a small telescope you should see the bright orb of Venus next to the ringed world of Saturn in the same field of view! (click to enlarge) – Credit: Sky-Watching/Stellarium

Sunday 10th January – Today the New Moon rises and sets with the Sun, so now is a good time to observe deep sky objects like galaxies and nebulae, or get a clearer look at objects usually blurred and faint in light polluted skies

Tuesday 12th January – BBC’s Stargazing Live starts tonight on BBC2 (and BBC2 HD) from 21:00, and continues for the next 4 evenings!

Thursday 14th January – Inner planet Mercury is in Inferior Conjunction and is currently unobservable

Friday 15th January – Today the Moon is at Perigee at a distance of 364,355 km (226,400 miles) from the Earth, the closest it will come on it’s current orbit

Saturday 16th January – This evening the Moon will be seen at First Quarter phase

And to help you identify the constellations you can see throughout the month, below we’ve provided guide images for both southern and northern skies in January

Shown at 00:00 UTC on 16th January, both these images are a handy guide for the whole month. This is the view you’ll get looking South (click to enlarge) – Credit: Sky-Watching/Stellarium

Shown at 00:00 UTC on 16th January, both these images are a handy guide for the whole month. This is the view you’ll get looking South (click to enlarge) – Credit: Sky-Watching/Stellarium

Displaying the night sky midway through the month, this image can help you identify the constellations you’ll see in the northern sky in January (click to enlarge) – Credit: Sky-Watching/Stellarium

Displaying the night sky midway through the month, this image can help you identify the constellations you’ll see in the northern sky in January (click to enlarge) – Credit: Sky-Watching/Stellarium

Tuesday 19th January – If you have some good binoculars or a small ‘scope the Moon occults several stars of the Hyades cluster this evening, eventually passing in front of red giant Aldebaran (in the constellation Taurus) just before it sets around 03:00 UTC on 20th

The Moon crosses through the Hyades cluster over the course of the evening, shown above at 22:30 UTC (click to enlarge) - Credit: Sky-Watching/Stellarium

The Moon crosses through the Hyades cluster over the course of the evening, shown above at 22:30 UTC (click to enlarge) – Credit: Sky-Watching/Stellarium

Sunday 24th January – Today’s Full Moon is sometimes known as the Winter Moon, Holiday Moon or Wolf Moon

Wednesday 27th January – Waning Moon accompanies Jupiter across the sky this evening, rising just before 21:00 UTC the pair will look great through binoculars or a small telescope!

Shown above at 22:00 UTC, Jupiter and the waning Moon will accompany each other across the sky this evening (click to enlarge) - Credit:Sky-Watching/Stellarium

Shown above at 22:00 UTC, Jupiter and the waning Moon will accompany each other across the sky this evening (click to enlarge) – Credit:Sky-Watching/Stellarium

Saturday 30th January – The Moon is at Apogee for the second time this month today, at a distance of 404,550 km (251,376 miles)

As usual, if you take any photos throughout January you’d like to show us, please tweet them to us using the link below! We’d love to see your efforts and we’ll re-tweet them to your fellow sky-watchers!

Happy new year from everyone at Sky-Watching!

Planets visible this month:

Venus
Saturn
Neptune
Mars
Uranus
Jupiter
Mercury

Remember, it can take your eyes up to 20 minutes to become properly dark adapted, and anything up to an hour for a telescope to reach ambient temperature outside (to ensure the best image), so give yourself plenty of time to get set up!

To make it easier to find this list of astronomical happenings you can also locate it in the “Monthly Guide” section in the menu bar to the right. Handy! 🙂

Guide images created with Stellarium

Archive:
Astronomy Events – December 2015
Astronomy Events – November 2015
Astronomy Events – October 2015

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Astronomy Events – December 2015

November 30, 2015

by Adam Welbourn

And in the blink of an eye December is once again upon us, and another year of Sky-Watching guides is all but complete. It’s been another good year for amateur stargazers and already some are looking to 2016.

But don’t miss what’s happening in front of you by looking only towards the future… or something.

To close out the year below we’ve listed some interesting astral events for December. Remember to wrap up warm if you do venture outside, but as always the rewards are there for those who seek them 🙂

All that remains is for us to wish happy holidays to all our visitors, enjoy the festive season!

Keep watching those skies…

Thursday 3rd December  – This morning our Moon will be seen at Last Quarter phase

Friday 4th December – If you happen to be up during the small hours this morning the Moon and Jupiter can be seen as close companions. A great opportunity for some astro snaps!

A good opportunity for some photos as the Moon and Jupiter cross the sky together, shown at 01:30 UTC (click to enlarge) - Credit: Sky-Watching/Stellarium

A good opportunity for some photos as the Moon and Jupiter cross the sky together this morning, shown here at 01:30 UTC (click to enlarge) – Credit: Sky-Watching/Stellarium

Saturday 5th December – The Moon is at Apogee today at a distance of 404,800 km (251,531 miles), the furthest point its orbit will take it away from the Earth this month

Friday 11th December – Today the New Moon rises and sets with the Sun, so now is a good time to observe deep sky objects like galaxies and nebulae, or get a clearer look at objects usually blurred and faint in light polluted skies

Winter favourite Orion is once again a fixture in our night sky, and a welcome sight it is too! (click to enlarge) - Credit: Sky-Watching/A.Welbourn

Winter favourite Orion is once again a fixture in our night sky, and a welcome sight it is too! (click to enlarge) – Credit: Sky-Watching/A.Welbourn

Sunday 13th December – The next two evenings provide a great opportunity to observe the shooting stars of the fantastic Geminid meteor shower. With the Moon out of the way your chances of spotting some are all the greater!

Meteor showers are fascinating to watch! (click to enlarge) - Credit: Sky-Watching/A.Welbourn

Meteor showers are fascinating to watch! We’re hoping for clear skies as you can’t have enough meteor photos in our opinion  (click to enlarge) – Credit: Sky-Watching/A.Welbourn

Couple this with the fact Geminids are known to be relatively slow moving and we could be on for a nice display! Wrap up warm, get comfy outside looking up and enjoy the show!

Wednesday 16th December – To help you identify the constellations you can see throughout the month, below we’ve provided guide images for both southern and northern skies in December

Shown at 00:00 UTC on 16th December, both these images are a handy guide for the whole month. This is the view you’ll get looking South (click to enlarge) – Credit: Sky-Watching/Stellarium

Shown at 00:00 UTC on 16th December, both these images are a handy guide for the whole month. This is the view you’ll get looking South (click to enlarge) – Credit: Sky-Watching/Stellarium

Displaying the night sky midway through the month, this image can help you identify the constellations you’ll see in the northern sky in December (click to enlarge) – Credit: Sky-Watching/Stellarium

Displaying the night sky midway through the month, this image can help you identify the constellations you’ll see in the northern sky in December (click to enlarge) – Credit: Sky-Watching/Stellarium

Friday 18th December – This afternoon the Moon will be seen at First Quarter phase

Monday 21st December – Today the Moon is at Perigee at a distance of 368,415 km (228,922 miles) from the Earth, the closest it will come on it’s current orbit

Tuesday 22nd December – Today is Winter Solstice in the Northern Hemisphere (at 04:48 UTC)

Friday 25th December – Today’s Full Moon is sometimes known as the Christmas Moon, Bitter Moon or Cold Moon

A Full Moon shot with a Canon EOS 550D mounted on a Sky-Watcher Explorer 200P Newtonian Reflector Telescope (click to enlarge) - Credit: Sky-Watching/A.Welbourn

A Full Moon shot with a Canon EOS 550D mounted on a Sky-Watcher Explorer 200P Newtonian Reflector Telescope (click to enlarge) – Credit: Sky-Watching/A.Welbourn

Tuesday 29th December – Inner planet Mercury is at Greatest Eastern Elongation and may be visible as a evening object for a short while after sunset (if your horizon is flat enough!). Look to the south west around 16:45 UTC

As usual, if you take any photos throughout December you’d like to show us, please tweet them to us using the link below! We’d love to see your efforts and we’ll re-tweet them to your fellow sky-watchers!

Planets visible this month:

Venus
Saturn
Neptune
Mars
Uranus
Jupiter
Mercury

Remember, it can take your eyes up to 20 minutes to become properly dark adapted, and anything up to an hour for a telescope to reach ambient temperature outside (to ensure the best image), so give yourself plenty of time to get set up!

To make it easier to find this list of astronomical happenings you can also locate it in the “Monthly Guide” section in the menu bar to the right. Handy! 🙂

Guide images created with Stellarium

Archive:
Astronomy Events – November 2015
Astronomy Events – October 2015
Astronomy Events – September 2015

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Astronomy Events – March 2015

February 28, 2015

by yaska77

We’re now heading into one of my two favourite times of year. Spring and Autumn are perfect for some long evenings out under the stars, you still get the benefit of longer nights without the downside of frostbite!

There’s quite a lot to get excited about in March, plenty of the usual spotting opportunities and a solar eclipse into the bargain. Although it will only be partially visible from the UK, the Moon will still cross enough of the Sun for it to darken the sky. Keep fingers crossed we can all enjoy this rare marvel!

And to coincide with the eclipse the massively popular BBC series Stargazing Live returns, with live coverage of the eclipse in a TV first from the BBC. But I’ll post about that in more detail closer to the time!

With everything else and an eclipse there’s loads to see in March, so get outside and keep watching the skies…

Tuesday 3rd March Jupiter appears close by the waxing gibbous Moon this evening as they journey across the night sky. They will both shine brightly so you can’t miss them!

Wednesday 4th March – If you have access to a small telescope and fairly dark skies this evening, Venus appears only 6 arc minutes away from the often difficult to spot Uranus

Look towards the west from nightfall to spot Venus with Uranus this evening, but with the two so close it's a great opportunity to spot one of the harder to find planets (click to enlarge) - Credit: Sky-Watching/Stellarium

Look towards the west from nightfall to spot Venus with Uranus this evening, but with the two so close it’s a great opportunity to spot one of the harder to find planets (click to enlarge) – Credit: Sky-Watching/Stellarium

Uranus appears almost 10,000 times fainter than Venus but being so close it’s a good opportunity to use the brighter planet as a spotting guide!  Look low to the west soon after sunset and you may also spot Mars just below too

Thursday 5th March – The Full Moon today is sometimes known as the Fish Moon, Sleepy Moon or Chaste Moon

It’s also at Apogee at a distance of 406,385 km (252,516 miles), the furthest point out in its orbit around the Earth this month

Friday 13th March – This evening our Moon will be seen at Last Quarter phase

Monday 16th March – To help identify the constellations you can see throughout the month, below we’ve provided guide images for both southern and northern skies in March

Shown at 00:00 UTC on 16th March, both these images are a handy guide for the whole month. This is the view you’ll get looking South (click to enlarge) – Credit: Sky-Watching/Stellarium

Shown at 00:00 UTC on 16th March, both these images are a handy guide for the whole month. This is the view you’ll get looking South (click to enlarge) – Credit: Sky-Watching/Stellarium

Displaying the night sky midway through the month, this image can help you identify the constellations you’ll see in the northern sky in March (click to enlarge) – Credit: Sky-Watching/Stellarium

Displaying the night sky midway through the month, this image can help you identify the constellations you’ll see in the northern sky in March (click to enlarge) – Credit: Sky-Watching/Stellarium

Thursday 19th March – Today the Moon is at Perigee (the closest point of its orbit to the Earth) at a distance of 357,585 km (222,192 miles)

Friday 20th March – A solar eclipse occurs today, which will be at least partially visible from the UK. Those in the north west of the country will get the best show with the eclipse effect decreasing the further south east you are

A total solar eclipse will occur on Friday March 20, 2015. The only populated places where the totality can be seen, reachable by public travel, are the Faroe Islands and Svalbard, but it will be partially visible to the UK (click to enlarge) - Credit: Fred Espenak, NASA's GSFC

A total solar eclipse will occur on Friday March 20, 2015. The only populated places where the totality can be seen, reachable by public travel, are the Faroe Islands and Svalbard, but it will be partially visible from the UK (click to enlarge) – Credit: Fred Espenak, NASA’s GSFC

Beginning just after 08:00 UTC and continuing until nearly 11:00 UTC, totality will only be visible from the Faroe Islands or the archipelago of Svalbard (north of mainland Norway) but the BBC show Stargazing Live will be broadcasting live coverage on BBC1 at 09:00 UTC

Please remember though, never look at the Sun directly, you will damage your eyes

Solar eclipse glasses can be bought online (try Amazon or Ebay) and will give you a great but safe view of the Moon crossing the Sun

Today is also Spring Equinox in the Northern Hemisphere

Sunday 22nd March – If you’ve got some binoculars you’ll have a great view of a beautifully bright Venus next to the thin crescent Moon this evening

Shown above at 19:30 UTC, if you have clear skies you'll get a great view of the thin cresent Moon and Venus this evening (click to enlarge) - Credit: Sky-Watching/Stellarium

Shown above at 19:30 UTC, if you have clear skies you’ll get a great view of the thin cresent Moon and Venus this evening (click to enlarge) – Credit: Sky-Watching/Stellarium

If skies are clear enough you should be able to see Earthshine lighting the usually dark surface of the Moon!

This time at 4 second exposure, f/3.5 ISO100 - More of the Moon is lit by the Sun as it shines next to Venus (Jupiter is below the cloud) from 26th March 2012 (click to enlarge) Credit: Sky-Watching/A.Welbourn

Taken at 4 second exposure, f/3.5 ISO100 – Earthshine is light reflecting from the Earth to reveal details on the surface of the Moon usually hidden in shadow. Here we imaged a similar conjunction of Venus and the Moon on 26th March 2012 (click to enlarge) Credit: Sky-Watching/A.Welbourn

We took the image above in March 2012, but it’s not too dissimilar to how they will look this evening!

Friday 27th March – This morning the Moon is at First Quarter phase

Sunday 29th March – British Summer Time begins in the UK, and the clocks go forward 1 hour from 01:00 GMT/UTC to 02:00 BST

As usual, if you take any photos throughout March you’d like to show us, please tweet them to us using the link below! We’d love to see your efforts and we’ll re-tweet them to your fellow sky-watchers!

Planets visible this month:

Jupiter
Mars
Mercury
Saturn
Uranus
Venus

Remember, it can take your eyes up to 20 minutes to become properly dark adapted, and anything up to an hour for a telescope to reach ambient temperature outside (to ensure the best image), so give yourself plenty of time to get set up!

To make it easier to find this list of astronomical happenings you can also locate it in the “Monthly Guide” section in the menu bar to the right. Handy! 🙂

Guide images created with Stellarium

Archive:
Astronomy Events – February 2015
Astronomy Events – January 2015
Astronomy Events – December 2014

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