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Astronomy Events – November 2015

October 31, 2015

by Adam Welbourn

Blimey it’s getting colder now isn’t it!? A few clearer evenings at the end of October and you don’t half notice the chill in the air. Great conditions for observing the heavens then!

November sees some great sights to behold (and image!) and with a meteor shower thrown into the mix it’s a great way to get kids interested in the night sky. How can that not be a good thing!?

Just remember to keep yourselves wrapped up warm, fill a flask with your hot beverage of choice and stay safe 🙂

Keep watching those skies…

Tuesday 3rd November  – This afternoon our Moon will be seen at Last Quarter phase

Saturday 7th November – The waning crescent Moon is at Apogee today at a distance of 405,720 km (252,103 miles), the furthest point its orbit will take it away from the Earth this month

Shown above at 05:00 UTC, the thin crescent Moon joins Venus, Mars and Jupiter in the morning sky (click to enlarge) - Credit: Sky-Watching/Stellarium

Shown above at 05:00 UTC, the thin crescent Moon joins Venus, Mars and Jupiter in the morning sky (click to enlarge) – Credit: Sky-Watching/Stellarium

And if you’re an early riser it joins Venus, Mars and Jupiter in the sky before sunrise this morning. Look towards the east about 05:00 UTC (as above)

Wednesday 11th November – Today the New Moon rises and sets with the Sun, so now is a good time to observe deep sky objects like galaxies and nebulae, or get a clearer look at objects usually blurred and faint in light polluted skies

A beautiful sight through binoculars or a small telescope, the Pleiades Cluster (also know as the Seven Sisters) can be found due east at 19:30 UTC this evening

The Seven Sisters glow brightly after the images taken were stacked (click to enlarge) - Credit: Sky-Watching/A.Welbourn

The Seven Sisters glow brightly in this stacked image we captured using our own telescope and camera (click to enlarge) – Credit: Sky-Watching/A.Welbourn

Monday 16th November – To help you identify the constellations you can see throughout the month, below we’ve provided guide images for both southern and northern skies in November

Shown at 00:00 UTC on 16th November, both these images are a handy guide for the whole month. This is the view you’ll get looking South (click to enlarge) – Credit: Sky-Watching/Stellarium

Shown at 00:00 UTC on 16th November, both these images are a handy guide for the whole month. This is the view you’ll get looking South (click to enlarge) – Credit: Sky-Watching/Stellarium

Displaying the night sky midway through the month, this image can help you identify the constellations you’ll see in the northern sky in November (click to enlarge) – Credit: Sky-Watching/Stellarium

Displaying the night sky midway through the month, this image can help you identify the constellations you’ll see in the northern sky in November (click to enlarge) – Credit: Sky-Watching/Stellarium

Tuesday 17th November – Inner planet Mercury is in Superior Conjunction today, and is currently unobservable

Tonight sees the peak of the Leonid Meteor shower, with the best chance of seeing them coming later in the evening when the Moon has set

Meteor showers are a great way to get kids interested in the cosmos! (click to enlarge) - Credit: Sky-Watching/A.Welbourn

Meteor showers are a great way to get kids interested in the cosmos! (click to enlarge) – Credit: Sky-Watching/A.Welbourn

Thursday 19th November – This morning the Moon will be seen at First Quarter phase

Friday 20th November Mars is at aphelion today, the furthest point out that it’s orbit takes it from the Sun

Monday 23rd November – Today the Moon is at Perigee at a distance of 362,815 km (225,443 miles) from the Earth, the closest it will come on it’s current orbit

Wednesday 25th November – Tonight’s Full Moon is sometimes known as the White Moon, Snow Moon or Beaver Moon

Monday 30th November – Ringed planet Saturn is in Conjunction with the Sun today, and is currently unobservable

As usual, if you take any photos throughout November you’d like to show us, please tweet them to us using the link below! We’d love to see your efforts and we’ll re-tweet them to your fellow sky-watchers!

Planets visible this month:

Venus
Neptune
Mars
Uranus
Jupiter
Mercury

Remember, it can take your eyes up to 20 minutes to become properly dark adapted, and anything up to an hour for a telescope to reach ambient temperature outside (to ensure the best image), so give yourself plenty of time to get set up!

To make it easier to find this list of astronomical happenings you can also locate it in the “Monthly Guide” section in the menu bar to the right. Handy! 🙂

Guide images created with Stellarium

Archive:
Astronomy Events – October 2015
Astronomy Events – September 2015
Astronomy Events – August 2015

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