Posts Tagged ‘eclipse’

h1

Astronomy Events – September 2015

August 31, 2015

by yaska77

Summer obviously found somewhere better to be this year, after promising early hints of it looking to impose itself for a long stay. Plans of weekends spent outdoors with the BBQ going remain unfulfilled, and our night sky observing was limited to a single cloudy evening of Perseid meteor spotting!

For amateur stargazers however we’re now approaching one of the better times of year, longer evenings without the inconvenience of being frozen solid, so there’s more opportunity to spend some quality time outdoors watching the sky.

Below we’ve picked out some interesting interstellar instances for the month of September to help enhance your enjoyment the heavens!

Keep watching those skies…

Tuesday 1st September – The often illusive Neptune is at opposition in the constellation Aquarius today, so as it’s opposite the Sun in the sky it rises at sunset and sets at sunrise. It’s too faint to see by eye but if your skies are dark enough you might be able to catch it with binoculars or a small telescope

Friday 4th September Mercury is at Greatest Eastern Elongation, closely chasing the Sun across the sky

Saturday 5th September – This morning our Moon will be seen at Last Quarter phase

Sunday 13th September – Today the New Moon rises and sets with the Sun, so now is a good time to observe deep sky objects like galaxies and nebulae

Andromeda was the first galaxy we imaged, and this shot was created by stacking 50 single shots to bring out the clarity (click to enlarge) - Credit: Sky-Watching/A.Welbourn

Andromeda was the first galaxy we imaged, and will be high to the east around 21:30 UTC (22:30 BST) this evening (click to enlarge) – Credit: Sky-Watching/A.Welbourn

Monday 14th September – The Moon is at Apogee today at a distance of 406,465 km (252,566 miles), the furthest point its orbit will take it away from the Earth this month

Wednesday 16th September – To help you with identifying the constellations you can see throughout the month, below we’ve provided guide images for both southern and northern skies in September

Shown at 00:00 UTC (01:00 BST) on 16th September, both these images are a handy guide for the whole month. This is the view you’ll get looking South (click to enlarge) – Credit: Sky-Watching/Stellarium

Shown at 00:00 UTC (01:00 BST) on 16th September, both these images are a handy guide for the whole month. This is the view you’ll get looking South (click to enlarge) – Credit: Sky-Watching/Stellarium

Displaying the night sky midway through the month, this image can help you identify the constellations you’ll see in the northern sky in September (click to enlarge) – Credit: Sky-Watching/Stellarium

Displaying the night sky midway through the month, this image can help you identify the constellations you’ll see in the northern sky in September (click to enlarge) – Credit: Sky-Watching/Stellarium

Sunday 20th September – The brightest evening object Venus shines that little bit brighter at the moment, attaining greatest brilliancy today (at mag -4.5)

Monday 21st September – This morning the Moon will be seen at First Quarter phase

Wednesday 23rd September – Today it is Autumnal Equinox in the Northern Hemisphere

Monday 28th September – If you’re up late (or rising early!) on Monday morning you’ll not want to miss the total lunar eclipse of a September Full Moon (sometimes known as the Barley Moon, Mulberry Moon or Harvest Moon, but at eclipse it’s a Blood Moon)

Shown midway through entering the numbral shadow (at 01:45 UTC / 02:45 BST), this morning's total Lunar eclipse should be worth getting up for! (click to enlarge) - Credit: Sky-Watching/Stellarium

Shown midway through entering the umbral shadow (at 01:45 UTC / 02:45 BST), this morning’s total lunar eclipse should be worth getting up for! (click to enlarge) – Credit: Sky-Watching/Stellarium

Appearing at Perigee at a distance of 356,875 km (221,752 miles) from the Earth, this supermoon is the closest of the year, and will be completely eclipsed by the Earth’s shadow, first experiencing the weak penumbral shade soon after midnight UTC (01:00 BST), and entering the darker umbral shadow phase about an hour later at 01:07 UTC (02:07 BST)

On 25th April 2013 the Full Moon also experienced penumbral eclipse, shown above at 20:22 UTC (21:22 BST) with the Earth’s shadow visible across the northern edge (click to enlarge) – Credit: Sky-Watching/A.Welbourn

On 25th April 2013 the Full Moon also experienced penumbral eclipse, shown above at 20:22 UTC (21:22 BST) with the Earth’s shadow visible across the northern edge (click to enlarge) – Credit: Sky-Watching/A.Welbourn

Totality will occur another hour after that (about 02:11 UTC / 03:11 BST) and last for just over another hour! Cameras and scopes at the ready as we’d love to image this properly. Please let the weather be kind!

Wednesday 30th September – Inner planet Mercury is at Inferior Conjunction and is currently unobservable

As usual, if you take any photos throughout September you’d like to show us, please tweet them to us using the link below! We’d love to see your efforts and we’ll re-tweet them to your fellow sky-watchers!

Planets visible this month:

Saturn
Venus
Neptune
Mars
Uranus
Jupiter

Remember, it can take your eyes up to 20 minutes to become properly dark adapted, and anything up to an hour for a telescope to reach ambient temperature outside (to ensure the best image), so give yourself plenty of time to get set up!

To make it easier to find this list of astronomical happenings you can also locate it in the “Monthly Guide” section in the menu bar to the right. Handy! :)

Guide images created with Stellarium

Archive:
Astronomy Events – August 2015
Astronomy Events – July 2015
Astronomy Events – June 2015

h1

Astronomy Events – April 2015

March 31, 2015

by yaska77

As much as I love the longer dark winter evenings I’ll admit I am now thoroughly bored of the cold. The clocks going forward an hour at the end of March has helped give us the first hints of the lighter summer evenings to come, and it’s a good feeling!

So while dreaming of that summer barbecue with friends leading in to a long evening sky-watching, below I’ve listed some spring astronomical events to encourage you to become reacquainted with the great outdoors. Have fun and stay safe all.

Keep watching the skies…

Wednesday 1st April – Our Moon is at Apogee today at a distance of 406,010 km (252,282 miles), the furthest point out in its orbit around the Earth this month

Saturday 4th April – Today’s Full Moon is sometimes known as the Flower Moon, Seed Moon or Pink Moon

It also sees a Total Lunar Eclipse occur, visible from eastern Asia, Australasia, the Pacific Ocean and western parts of North America, but sadly not to those of us in the UK (our last partially visible eclipse was in April 2013)

On 25th April 2013 the Full Moon also experienced penumbral eclipse, shown above at 20:22 UTC (21:22 BST) with the Earth’s shadow visible across the northern edge (click to enlarge) – Credit: Sky-Watching/A.Welbourn

On 25th April 2013 the Full Moon experienced penumbral eclipse, shown above at 20:22 UTC (21:22 BST) with the Earth’s shadow visible across the northern edge (click to enlarge) – Credit: Sky-Watching/A.Welbourn

Monday 6th April – The planet Uranus is in Conjunction with the Sun and is currently unobservable

Friday 10th April – Inner planet Mercury is in Superior Conjunction today

Saturday 11th April – Venus is still present as a spectacularly bright object in the early evening sky. Tonight it will appear to pass close to the Pleiades or “Seven Sisters” (so it should be a great photographic target!)

Look low to the west soon after sunset and you can't fail to spot Venus near the fainter but equally beautiful Pleiades cluster, shown above at 20:00 UTC / 21:00 BST (click to enlarge) Credit: Sky-Watching/Stellarium

Look low to the west soon after sunset and you can’t fail to spot Venus near the fainter but equally beautiful Pleiades cluster, shown above at 20:00 UTC/21:00 BST (click to enlarge) – Credit: Sky-Watching/Stellarium

We managed to get a few shots when Venus made a similar pass by the Seven Sisters in 2012. If you have some binoculars to help get a closer look it will be well worth your time!

The bright planet Venus shines next to the Pleiades cluster, and the setting Jupiter is accompanied by some of her moons (click to enlarge) - Credit: Sky-Watching/A.Welbourn

The bright planet Venus shines next to the Pleiades cluster, and the setting Jupiter is accompanied by some of her moons at bottom right (click to enlarge) – Credit: Sky-Watching/A.Welbourn

Sunday 12th April – This morning our Moon will be seen at Last Quarter phase

Thursday 16th April – To help identify the constellations you can see throughout the month, below we’ve provided guide images for both southern and northern skies in April

Shown at 00:00 UTC (01:00 BST) on 16th April, both these images are a handy guide for the whole month. This is the view you’ll get looking South (click to enlarge) – Credit: Sky-Watching/Stellarium

Shown at 00:00 UTC (01:00 BST) on 16th April, both these images are a handy guide for the whole month. This is the view you’ll get looking South (click to enlarge) – Credit: Sky-Watching/Stellarium

Displaying the night sky midway through the month, this image can help you identify the constellations you’ll see in the northern sky in April (click to enlarge) – Credit: Sky-Watching/Stellarium

Displaying the night sky midway through the month, this image can help you identify the constellations you’ll see in the northern sky in April (click to enlarge) – Credit: Sky-Watching/Stellarium

Friday 17th April – Today the Moon is at Perigee (the closest point of its orbit to the Earth) at a distance of 361,025 km (224,331 miles)

Saturday 18th April – Today the New Moon rises and sets with the Sun, so it’s a good time to observe deep sky objects like galaxies and nebulae which are usually harder to see when the Moon is shining in the sky

Wednesday 22nd/
Thursday 23rd April 
– The annual Lyrid meteor shower peaks this evening, with the radiant (the point all meteors appear to originate from) in the constellation Lyra which you’ll find low to the north east around 22:00 UTC/23:00 BST

This one shows a nice long clear Perseid tail, with more definition to the shap at the end of the streak (click to enlarge) - Credit: Sky-Watching/A.Welbourn

We’re hoping to capture some Lyrid meteors this year, as they can give you some nice shots like this Perseid meteor we caught streaking away from the smudge of the Andromeda galaxy (click to enlarge) – Credit: Sky-Watching/A.Welbourn

The best time to see the meteors will be after midnight when the Moon has set, so if your skies are clear and you can face the late night it has got to be worth a look hasn’t it? Get outside and crane your necks!

Sunday 26th April – This morning the Moon is at First Quarter phase

Wednesday 29th April – The Moon is at Apogee today for the second time this month, at a distance of 405,085 km (251,708 miles)

As usual, if you take any photos throughout April you’d like to show us, please tweet them to us using the link below! We’d love to see your efforts and we’ll re-tweet them to your fellow sky-watchers!

Planets visible this month:

Jupiter
Mars
Mercury
Saturn
Venus

Remember, it can take your eyes up to 20 minutes to become properly dark adapted, and anything up to an hour for a telescope to reach ambient temperature outside (to ensure the best image), so give yourself plenty of time to get set up!

To make it easier to find this list of astronomical happenings you can also locate it in the “Monthly Guide” section in the menu bar to the right. Handy! :)

Guide images created with Stellarium

Archive:
Astronomy Events – March 2015
Astronomy Events – February 2015
Astronomy Events – January 2015

h1

Astronomy Events – March 2015

February 28, 2015

by yaska77

We’re now heading into one of my two favourite times of year. Spring and Autumn are perfect for some long evenings out under the stars, you still get the benefit of longer nights without the downside of frostbite!

There’s quite a lot to get excited about in March, plenty of the usual spotting opportunities and a solar eclipse into the bargain. Although it will only be partially visible from the UK, the Moon will still cross enough of the Sun for it to darken the sky. Keep fingers crossed we can all enjoy this rare marvel!

And to coincide with the eclipse the massively popular BBC series Stargazing Live returns, with live coverage of the eclipse in a TV first from the BBC. But I’ll post about that in more detail closer to the time!

With everything else and an eclipse there’s loads to see in March, so get outside and keep watching the skies…

Tuesday 3rd March Jupiter appears close by the waxing gibbous Moon this evening as they journey across the night sky. They will both shine brightly so you can’t miss them!

Wednesday 4th March – If you have access to a small telescope and fairly dark skies this evening, Venus appears only 6 arc minutes away from the often difficult to spot Uranus

Look towards the west from nightfall to spot Venus with Uranus this evening, but with the two so close it's a great opportunity to spot one of the harder to find planets (click to enlarge) - Credit: Sky-Watching/Stellarium

Look towards the west from nightfall to spot Venus with Uranus this evening, but with the two so close it’s a great opportunity to spot one of the harder to find planets (click to enlarge) – Credit: Sky-Watching/Stellarium

Uranus appears almost 10,000 times fainter than Venus but being so close it’s a good opportunity to use the brighter planet as a spotting guide!  Look low to the west soon after sunset and you may also spot Mars just below too

Thursday 5th March – The Full Moon today is sometimes known as the Fish Moon, Sleepy Moon or Chaste Moon

It’s also at Apogee at a distance of 406,385 km (252,516 miles), the furthest point out in its orbit around the Earth this month

Friday 13th March – This evening our Moon will be seen at Last Quarter phase

Monday 16th March – To help identify the constellations you can see throughout the month, below we’ve provided guide images for both southern and northern skies in March

Shown at 00:00 UTC on 16th March, both these images are a handy guide for the whole month. This is the view you’ll get looking South (click to enlarge) – Credit: Sky-Watching/Stellarium

Shown at 00:00 UTC on 16th March, both these images are a handy guide for the whole month. This is the view you’ll get looking South (click to enlarge) – Credit: Sky-Watching/Stellarium

Displaying the night sky midway through the month, this image can help you identify the constellations you’ll see in the northern sky in March (click to enlarge) – Credit: Sky-Watching/Stellarium

Displaying the night sky midway through the month, this image can help you identify the constellations you’ll see in the northern sky in March (click to enlarge) – Credit: Sky-Watching/Stellarium

Thursday 19th March – Today the Moon is at Perigee (the closest point of its orbit to the Earth) at a distance of 357,585 km (222,192 miles)

Friday 20th March – A solar eclipse occurs today, which will be at least partially visible from the UK. Those in the north west of the country will get the best show with the eclipse effect decreasing the further south east you are

A total solar eclipse will occur on Friday March 20, 2015. The only populated places where the totality can be seen, reachable by public travel, are the Faroe Islands and Svalbard, but it will be partially visible to the UK (click to enlarge) - Credit: Fred Espenak, NASA's GSFC

A total solar eclipse will occur on Friday March 20, 2015. The only populated places where the totality can be seen, reachable by public travel, are the Faroe Islands and Svalbard, but it will be partially visible from the UK (click to enlarge) – Credit: Fred Espenak, NASA’s GSFC

Beginning just after 08:00 UTC and continuing until nearly 11:00 UTC, totality will only be visible from the Faroe Islands or the archipelago of Svalbard (north of mainland Norway) but the BBC show Stargazing Live will be broadcasting live coverage on BBC1 at 09:00 UTC

Please remember though, never look at the Sun directly, you will damage your eyes

Solar eclipse glasses can be bought online (try Amazon or Ebay) and will give you a great but safe view of the Moon crossing the Sun

Today is also Spring Equinox in the Northern Hemisphere

Sunday 22nd March – If you’ve got some binoculars you’ll have a great view of a beautifully bright Venus next to the thin crescent Moon this evening

Shown above at 19:30 UTC, if you have clear skies you'll get a great view of the thin cresent Moon and Venus this evening (click to enlarge) - Credit: Sky-Watching/Stellarium

Shown above at 19:30 UTC, if you have clear skies you’ll get a great view of the thin cresent Moon and Venus this evening (click to enlarge) – Credit: Sky-Watching/Stellarium

If skies are clear enough you should be able to see Earthshine lighting the usually dark surface of the Moon!

This time at 4 second exposure, f/3.5 ISO100 - More of the Moon is lit by the Sun as it shines next to Venus (Jupiter is below the cloud) from 26th March 2012 (click to enlarge) Credit: Sky-Watching/A.Welbourn

Taken at 4 second exposure, f/3.5 ISO100 – Earthshine is light reflecting from the Earth to reveal details on the surface of the Moon usually hidden in shadow. Here we imaged a similar conjunction of Venus and the Moon on 26th March 2012 (click to enlarge) Credit: Sky-Watching/A.Welbourn

We took the image above in March 2012, but it’s not too dissimilar to how they will look this evening!

Friday 27th March – This morning the Moon is at First Quarter phase

Sunday 29th March – British Summer Time begins in the UK, and the clocks go forward 1 hour from 01:00 GMT/UTC to 02:00 BST

As usual, if you take any photos throughout March you’d like to show us, please tweet them to us using the link below! We’d love to see your efforts and we’ll re-tweet them to your fellow sky-watchers!

Planets visible this month:

Jupiter
Mars
Mercury
Saturn
Uranus
Venus

Remember, it can take your eyes up to 20 minutes to become properly dark adapted, and anything up to an hour for a telescope to reach ambient temperature outside (to ensure the best image), so give yourself plenty of time to get set up!

To make it easier to find this list of astronomical happenings you can also locate it in the “Monthly Guide” section in the menu bar to the right. Handy! :)

Guide images created with Stellarium

Archive:
Astronomy Events – February 2015
Astronomy Events – January 2015
Astronomy Events – December 2014

h1

Astronomy Events – November 2013

October 31, 2013

by yaska77

November is one of the best months for stargazing in my opinion.  It’s not so freezing your fingers fall off but the air is cold enough for good seeing conditions, it’s dark already when you get home from work so you can get your gear set up nice and early, and there’s usually quite a bit happening in the always familiar but ever changing night sky over our heads.

We had some mixed weather for October (mostly bad but the good nights we had were ruined by inconsiderate neighbours leaving their halogen garden lights on…) but as ever we hold out hope for November.

So with that in mind, for your delectation below we have itemised some astronomical awesomeness for you to ogle.  So get out there and keep watching the skies!

Friday 1st November – Planet Venus is at Greatest Eastern Elongation and will be visible low down to the SSW after sunset

Orbiting closest to the Sun, Mercury is in Inferior Conjunction today and therefore isn’t visible

If you have good binoculars or a small telescope, you should be able to locate the comet if you're up early morning (click to enlarge) - Credit: Sky-Watching/Stellarium

If you have good binoculars or a small telescope, you should be able to locate comet ISON if you’re up early morning, shown above at 03:45 UTC (click to enlarge) – Credit: Sky-Watching/Stellarium

And comet C/2012 S1 (ISON) will be below and to the left of Mars early this morning, almost forming a direct line to Regulus in the constellation Leo.  If it’s developed a tail you may be able to see it with the naked eye under dark skies

Sunday 3rd November – The New Moon rises with (and sets just after) the Sun today, so now is a good time to observe deep sky objects when the skies are unaffected by moonlight

Today also sees the Annular Solar Eclipse which occurs when the Sun and Moon are exactly in line, but the apparent size of the Moon is smaller than that of the Sun. Hence the Sun appears as a very bright ring, or annulus, surrounding the dark disk of the Moon

The image above shows where the eclipse will be visible - Credit: PD-USGOV-NASA

The image above shows where the eclipse will be visible (click to enlarge) – Credit: PD-USGOV-NASA

Unfortunately it won’t be visible from the UK, but if it’s clear we’ll still break out the solar filters for a look see!

Relative positions of the Sun and Moon as seen from the UK, shown at 12:45 UTC (Click to enlarge) - Credit: Sky-Watching/Stellarium

Relative positions of the Sun and Moon as seen from the UK, shown at 12:45 UTC on Sunday 3rd November (click to enlarge) – Credit: Sky-Watching/Stellarium

Wednesday 6th November – The waxing crescent Moon is at Perigee today at a distance of 365,360 km (227,024 miles), the closest point of its orbit to the Earth, and appears as a near neighbour to Venus after sunset too

Shown low to the SSW at 17:20 UTC, Venus and the crescent Moon can be seen close to each other (click to enlarge) - Credit: Sky-Watching/Stellarium

Shown low to the SSW at 17:20 UTC, Venus and the crescent Moon can be seen close to each other (click to enlarge) – Credit: Sky-Watching/Stellarium

We imaged a similar close liaison in January 2012, so can give you some idea of how it will look to the naked eye (although this time the sky will be brighter)!

Comparable Moon phase and similar effect, our image of Venus and the waxing crescent Moon from January 2012 came with added Earthshine! (click to enlarge) - Credit: Sky-Watching/A.Welbourn

Comparable Moon phase and similar effect, our image of Venus and the waxing crescent Moon from January 2012 came with added Earthshine! (click to enlarge) – Credit: Sky-Watching/A.Welbourn

Ringed planet Saturn is also in Conjunction with the Sun today, making it unobservable until much later in the month

Sunday 10th November – This morning the Moon is seen at First Quarter phase

Tuesday 12th November – Tonight is the peak of the Northern Taurid meteor shower, with the radiant being to the south after midnight

The Moon sets soon after 02:00 on the 13th so this could be the best time to spot them!

Sunday 17th November The Full Moon in the sky this evening is also sometimes known as the Beaver Moon, White Moon or Snow Moon

Monday 18th November – Mercury is at Greatest Western Elongation today, and should be visible low down to the east before sunrise

Visible low to the east before sunrise, Mercury is followed soon after by Saturn, shown above at 06:15 UTC (click to elarge) - Credit: Sky-Watching/Stellarium

Visible low to the east before sunrise, Mercury is followed soon after by Saturn, shown above at 06:15 UTC. And comet ISON is visiting bright star Spica in Virgo (click to elarge) – Credit: Sky-Watching/Stellarium

Comet C/2012 S1 (ISON) is also very close to Spica in the constellation Virgo, so should be easy to find in the hours before dawn

Friday 22nd November – Today the Moon is at Apogee at a distance of 405,445 km (251,932 miles), the farthest point out in its orbit around the Earth

Monday 25th November – The Moon appears at Last Quarter phase this evening

Tuesday 26th November – Early risers can look forward to a glimpse of Saturn and Mercury occupying the same camera frame this morning (if your eastern horizon is flat enough!)

A target we'd love a look at (living near the coast we can get near to a sea level flat horizon if we travel!), would be nice to have some clear evenings in November (click to enlarge) - Credit: Sky-Watching/Stellarium

A target we’d love a look at (living near the coast we can get near to a sea level flat horizon if we travel!), would be nice to have some clear evenings (and mornings) in November (click to enlarge) – Credit: Sky-Watching/Stellarium

They’ll appear over the horizon shortly before 06:00 UTC (shown above at 06:30) but the sky will be darker the earlier you can catch them.  If you get any photos we’d love you to tweet them to us!  Mercury is one of the planets we’ve yet to get a photo of!

Planets visible this month:

Jupiter
Venus
Neptune
Uranus
Mars
Mercury
Saturn

Remember, it can take your eyes up to 20 minutes to become properly dark adapted, and anything up to an hour for a telescope to reach ambient temperature outside (to ensure the best image), so give yourself plenty of time to get set up!

To make it easier to find this list of astronomical happenings you can also locate it in the “Monthly Guide” section in the menu bar to the right. Handy! :)

Guide images created with Stellarium

Archive:
Astronomy Events – October 2013
Astronomy Events – September 2013
Astronomy Events – August 2013

h1

Astronomy Events – October 2013

September 30, 2013

by yaska77

With the darker evenings now truly upon us it’s a great time to be out observing (before it gets really cold!).  October has historically been our best month for getting our own images too, so we are vowing to get our ‘scopes out again in October and we’ll post some of our results!

But is there anything of interest coming up in October we can look forward to?  As ever we’ve listed below some interesting heavenly happenings over the coming month, so keep watching the skies!

Thursday 3rd October – Planet Uranus is at Opposition in the constellation Pisces this evening, meaning it is in an opposite position in the sky to our Sun

Our guide below should help you locate it should you want to try and find it, as under dark skies you’ll spot it with a good pair of binoculars

Look southeast around 21:20 UTC/ 22:20 BST to find Uranus just below Pisces (click to enlarge) - Credit: Sky-Watching/Stellarium

Look southeast around 21:20 UTC/ 22:20 BST tonight to find Uranus just below Pisces (click to enlarge) – Credit: Sky-Watching/Stellarium

Saturday 5th October – The New Moon rises with (and sets just after) the Sun today, so now is a good time to observe deep sky objects when the skies are unaffected by moonlight

Monday 7th October – The annual Draconid meteor shower peaks this evening, and the thin waxing Moon shouldn’t interfere

Shown high to the northwest at 19:30 UTC/ 20:30 BST on 7th October, the Draconids often put on a really good show! (click to enlage) - Credit: Sky-Watching/Stellarium

Shown high to the northwest at 19:30 UTC/ 20:30 BST on 7th October, the Draconids often put on a really good show! (click to enlage) – Credit: Sky-Watching/Stellarium

Best viewed after nightfall, look to the northwest and hope the clouds stay away!  You should also get some more after dark on the 8th October too

Wednesday 9th October Mercury is at Greatest Eastern Elongation today, so this elusive planet should be visible low down in the southwest just after sunset

Thursday 10th October – The Moon is at Perigee today at a distance of 369,810 km (229,789 miles), the closest point of its orbit to the Earth

Friday 11th October – This evening the Moon is seen at First Quarter phase

A daytime First Quarter Moon we photographed in April 2012 (click to enlarge) – Credit: Sky-Watching/A.Welbourn

A daytime First Quarter Moon we photographed in April 2012 (click to enlarge) – Credit: Sky-Watching/A.Welbourn

Tuesday 15th October – Red Planet Mars pays a visit to bright star Regulus in the constellation Leo this morning. And if you imagine a line from Regulus through Mars and out the other side the same distance again, you should come across Comet C/2012 S1 (ISON)

A great opportunity to find it with a telescope, but even with binoculars you should still be able to make it out if your skies are dark enough

Shown to the east at 03:30 UTC/ 04:30 BST, this is a great opportunity to find comet ISON for a look through a telescope (click to enlarge) - Credit: Sky-Watching/Stellarium

Shown to the east at 03:30 UTC/ 04:30 BST, this is a great way to help find comet ISON for a look at it through a telescope! (click to enlarge) – Credit: Sky-Watching/Stellarium

Friday 18th October The Full Moon in the sky this evening is also sometimes known as the Blood Moon, Hunter’s Moon or Blackberry Moon

It will also be experiencing a penumbral eclipse which occurs when the Moon passes through the Earth’s penumbra, which causes a subtle darkening of the Moon’s surface

This guide shows visibility of penumbral eclipse ny location (click to enlarge) - Credit: Fred Espenak (NASA GSFC)

This guide shows visibility of the penumbral eclipse by location (click to enlarge) – Credit: Fred Espenak (NASA GSFC)

It will be visible from the Americas (for the end), Europe, Africa, and most of Asia (the beginning of the eclipse will be visible in east Asia). The western part of the Philippines (including western Luzon and Palawan) can see the penumbral eclipse at moonset

On 25th April 2013 the Full Moon also experienced penumbral eclipse, shown above at 20:22 UTC (21:22 BST) with the Earth’s shadow visible across the northern edge (click to enlarge) – Credit: Sky-Watching/A.Welbourn

On 25th April 2013 the Full Moon also experienced penumbral eclipse, shown above at 20:22 UTC (21:22 BST) with the Earth’s shadow visible across the northern edge (click to enlarge) – Credit: Sky-Watching/A.Welbourn

We caught a faint darkening on the Moon’s top edge in some photos during the penumbral eclipse in April, so hopefully this one will make for some nice photos too!

Monday 21st October – The annual Orionid Meteor Shower peaks in the early hours this morning, but the bright light from the waning gibbous Moon will wash out most of the faint ones.  The best times to view are from midnight until dawn on 20th, 21st and 22nd October, see below for a radiant guide (the direction the meteors will appear to emanate from)

Shown to the southeast at 02:00 UTC/ 03:00 BST, this is where Orionid meteors will appear to originate from (click to enlarge) - Credit: Sky-Watching/Stellarium

Shown to the southeast at 02:00 UTC/ 03:00 BST on 21st October 2013, this is where Orionid meteors will appear to originate from (click to enlarge) – Credit: Sky-Watching/Stellarium

Friday 25th October – Today the Moon is at Apogee at a distance of 404,560 km (251,382 miles), the farthest point out in its orbit around the Earth

Saturday 26th October – The Moon appears at Last Quarter phase this evening, and will be very close to Jupiter which is visible in the Gemini constellation

Shown to the east at 00:30 UTC/01:30 BST, the last quarter Moon appears near Jupiter (click to enlarge) - Credit: Sky-Watching/Stellarium

Shown to the east at 00:30 UTC/ 01:30 BST, the last quarter Moon appears near Jupiter (click to enlarge) – Credit: Sky-Watching/Stellarium

Sunday 27th October – British Summer Time ends in the UK, and the clocks go back 1 hour to GMT/UTC at 02:00 BST

Planets visible this month:

Jupiter
Venus
Neptune
Uranus
Mars
Mercury

Remember, it can take your eyes up to 20 minutes to become properly dark adapted, and anything up to an hour for a telescope to reach ambient temperature outside (to ensure the best image), so give yourself plenty of time to get set up!

To make it easier to find this list of astronomical happenings you can also locate it in the “Monthly Guide” section in the menu bar to the right. Handy! :)

Guide images created with Stellarium

Archive:
Astronomy Events – September 2013
Astronomy Events – August 2013
Astronomy Events – July 2013

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 6,608 other followers

%d bloggers like this: